Sumac-Spiced Chicken Cutlets with Tomato-Onion Salad recipe from Milk Street Tuesday Nights Mediterranean

#MilkStreet @MilkStreet #177MilkStreet @177MilkStreet #CPKimball @CPKimball #Mediterranean #TNMEDBOOK @TNMEDBOOK

If you’ve been following my blog for awhile, you know that I love everything Milk Street does. Always phenomenal. If you’re already a Milk Street fan, you are going to love Milk Street Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. If you’re new to Milk Street, you’re in for a treat. They are absolute minimalists on everything but flavor. They’ll get you from the counter to the table in the easiest way possible. And they’re really strong flavorists.

I posted their recipe for Spaghetti with Lemon Pesto last week. If you missed that, you have to go back and make it! And you can see my full review of the book there. I wanted to share one more dish from this fabulous book with you. Sumac-Spiced Chicken Cutlets with Tomato-Onion Salad. Oh gosh. Are these ever fantastic. Don’t laugh, but if you’ve ever really enjoyed the pucker of a Sour Patch Kid, and you haven’t tried sumac, you’re missing out. The flavor of this dish is really unique and wonderful. 


Excerpted from MILK STREET: TUESDAY NIGHTS MEDITERRANEAN. Copyright © 2021 by CPK Media, LLC. Photographs by Connie Miller. Used with permission of Voracious, an imprint of Little, Brown and Company. New York, NY. All rights reserved.

Sumac-Spiced Chicken Cutlets with Tomato- Onion Salad

Start to finish 30 minutes Servings 4

In the Palestinian dish called musakhan, chicken is seasoned with tangy, deep-red sumac. The combination of ingredients gave us the idea for these quick-cooking cutlets, which we matched with a tomato salad garnished with a mixture of red onion, parsley and sweet-tart pomegranate molasses. Look for both sumac and pomegranate molasses in well-stocked grocery stores, spice shops or Middle Eastern markets. If your chicken cutlets are thicker than about ¼ inch, pound them thin so they cook quickly and evenly. We like to slice the cutlets for serving, but you can leave them whole if you prefer. Serve with warm flatbread, a nod to the taboon bread that’s a component in traditional musakhan.

3 tablespoons ground sumac
2 tablespoons ground coriander
½ teaspoon smoked paprika
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
½ medium red onion
, thinly slice
3 tablespoons pomegranate molasses, plus more to serve
Four 4- to 5-ounce chicken breast cutlets (about ¼ inch thick), patted dry
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
½ cup lightly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 pounds ripe tomatoes
, cored and sliced crosswise about ½-inch thick

Don’t crowd the skillet when sautéing the chicken. If your cutlets are large and don’t all fit comfortably in the pan, it’s better to cook them in two batches, using 1 tablespoon oil for each batch.

In a small bowl, stir together the sumac, coriander, paprika and 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper. In a medium bowl, combine the onion, pomegranate molasses, 2 tablespoons of the seasoning mix and ½ teaspoon salt, then toss to combine; set aside. Season the chicken on both sides with the remaining seasoning mix.

In a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high, heat 1 tablespoon of oil until barely smoking. Add the chicken in a single layer and cook until well browned on both sides, 3 to 5 minutes total, flipping the cutlets once. Transfer to a cutting board and tent with foil.

To the onion mixture, add the parsley and remaining 3 tablespoons oil, then toss to combine. Arrange the tomato slices on a platter and season with salt and pepper. Distribute the onion-parsley mixture over the tomatoes.

Slice the chicken against the grain on the diagonal. Arrange the chicken on the salad, then pour over accumulated juices. Drizzle with additional pomegranate molasses.


Need more Milk Street? Here are a few more recipes and books of theirs I reviewed…

Jalapeno-Apricot Glazed Chicken Thighs and Cookbook review: Milk Street: Cookish (Cookish)

Milk Street’s recipes for Israeli Hummus with Spiced Beef Topping and Lebanese-Style Tabbouleh (The Milk Street Cookbook)

Beef, Orange and Olive Stew (The New Rules)

Maple-Whiskey Pudding Cakes (Tuesday Nights)


Pinterest? Sure!

Here’s a link to all my boards.
Here’s a link to my recipes on Pinterest.
Here’s a link to my cookbook reviews on Pinterest.


Need anything? I’m an Amazon Affiliate. Any time you use one of my links to get to Amazon to make a purchase, Amazon gives me a tiny percentage. I put it back into next year’s blog fees. Thank you!

Milk Street Tuesday Nights Mediterranean

Sumac

Cookish

Milk Street The New Rules

Milk Street Tuesday Nights

The Milk Street Cookbook

My favorite knife. It’s a 7″ full tang Santoku. I chose the Ikon handle design, which is wonderfully ergonomic. I have spent hours on a produce sculpture before and my hand was just as comfy at the end. It’s worth the pennies.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 21-fzcm1jvl._ac_.jpg

Wusthof WU4176 Classic Ikon 7-Inch Santoku, Hollow Edge, Black

My favorite cast iron skillet is a 12″ Lodge dual handle pan. Why, the long handles are too heavy to hold with a single hand when they’re loaded up. Since you’re using two hands anyway, you might as well get the ones that take up less space and stack so much better!

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is lodge-12.jpg

Lodge 12″ dual handle cast-iron pan